Criticism

Changing my Perspective on Constructive Criticism

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week  South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week

South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

I used to correlate constructive criticism with judgement. Sometimes, I still do. It is difficult for me to hear the flaws that people point out in me, even if it is for me to grow and not to be harmful. I find it humorous that I am able to criticize others but take offense when it is given to myself. People see a lot of good in me but I also have a lot of things I need to work on. I find it beneficial to be around those giving me constructive criticism. Without it, many of my defects would continue and I would not be aware. My selfishness justifies my attitudes and actions as being correct. I often find myself pushing people’s buttons without intentionally trying to do so. I need to understand that not everybody is the same and that others may react to my behaviors differently. Although my intentions may be genuine, my actions do not always follow which sometimes bothers others. I am trying to change my perspective to understand that anytime constructive criticism is given, I am able to take the opportunity to learn and grow.

Accepting Criticism as a Tool for Personal Growth

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week  South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week

South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Like any good athlete, businessman, or student, one must be able to receive and accept criticism as a tool for growth and progress. Having to truly look at my defects has been tough and uncomfortable, but its been a gift. Having the opportunity to be able to salvage the broken parts of myself is allowing me more peace of mind, confidence, and hope. I am fortunate enough to have the chance of becoming the best version of myself I can be. Being able to not just hear, but listen to the criticism from others has put things into perspective and corrected the prescription of my lenses from which I view the world. It has been helping me not take things so personally, which has always been a destructive force in my recovery. What a difference taking direction can make.

Becoming the Best Version of Myself- Criticism in Recovery

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week  South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week

South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism isn’t always easy to hear. It can be difficult to hear the truth about ourselves in which we do not want to look at. It is vital if we are to change and grow in any part of our lives. One area for myself in which I need to take a look at is how my actions affect others, especially my attitude. I need to be more self-aware of how I treat others. I need to start showing more respect and love towards the people who genuinely love and care for me. It is not always easy for me to trust people, but I have to be able to learn to trust somebody. Being self-critical is also an unhealthy defect that I have created over the years. There are many areas in my life that I need to work on but often find myself being too hard on myself. I need to learn to believe that I am worthy of grace. I am noticing the importance of self-awareness and have begun to construct the foundation needed to correct these character defects that I have been blind to and struggled with over the years. It is better to surround yourself with people who are honest and have your best interest at heart in order to grow and become the best possible version of yourself.

Constructive Criticism-A Necessity for Personal Growth

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week  South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week

South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Being open minded to criticism has always been a difficult concept for me to accept. Stubborn in my ways, I often found myself not willing to learn from the advice given to me by others, especially when I felt I was right. I always felt that it was the father’s role to instill in their child the appropriate behaviors ways of doing things. Because the majority of my childhood lacked guidance, I developed a sense of untrustworthiness and vulnerability in regards to what others thought was best for me. I felt that having to accept criticism was a sign of weakness. Still to this day, when others seek to give me criticism, I revert back to my ten- year old self. I find myself continuously reliving my childhood wounds. My stubbornness in terms of criticism shadows my true feeling of fear. Through self- discovery over the years, I have learned that I truly crave and yearn for criticism and guidance more than anything. That being able to accept constructive criticism is a personal form of growth. I have trouble expressing my desire for it though because of emotional stage it puts me in. Emotionally, mentally, and physically lost and not feeling good enough. Because of this, anytime I am given criticism I tend to take things extremely personally. I tend to believe any remark or advice given is a degrading judgement or personal attack against me. Thus being said, I created unhealthy, codependent relationships that created a false sense of guidance without being directly criticized. I have always had leadership qualities but never asserted myself to lead. I have always felt comfortable and the need for somebody to show me the way. The irony is that I am often unwilling to listen to them. The hardest thing about living a life in recovery for myself is being able to understand and accept that my way of thinking is what led to such a destructive path of behavior. I still find it extremely difficult to put my faith in others. I still find it difficult to believe that somebody’s criticism can be given solely for me to better myself. Eventually, if you are fortunate enough to have been blessed with the gift of desperation, your own words will lose all meaning and you will be forced to listen to what somebody else has to say. As Winston Churchill once said, Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things.”

 

It Only Takes One Person, One Moment to Change your Life Forever

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week  South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

Criticism- Recovery Word of the Week

South OC Detox & Treatment- 949-584-5927

A couple hundred years ago, Benjamin Franklin shared with the world the secrets of success. “Never leave that till tomorrow which you can do today.” This is the man who discovered electricity – you’d think more of us would listen to what he has to say. I don’t know why we put things off, but if I had to guess, I’d say it has a lot to do with fear. Fear of failure, fear of pain, fear of rejection. Sometimes the fear is of just making a decision, because what if you’re wrong? What if you’re making a mistake you can’t undo? I’ve been an oppositionally defiant, stubborn, procrastinator my entire life. I’ve always been resistant to criticism and feedback from others – which is unfortunate, because I’ve probably made more mistakes than most. No matter how constructive, criticism used to quickly put me on the defense. In the past when I was criticized, I’d often feel personally attacked. But by immediately reacting, I was doing myself a disservice and was unable to gain valuable insight into possible flaws and areas where I could improve.  Thanks to Salina’s guidance, in sobriety I’m much more open to differing perspectives & criticism from others.  Now I’m able to recognize that we all make terrible mistakes, but that doesn’t mean we’re terrible people.  We screw up. We lose our way. Even the best of us have our off days. Still we move forward.  And it turns out sometimes we have to do the wrong thing. Mistakes are painful, but they’re the only way to find out who we really are.  Sometimes we just need to shift our thinking. Get a new perspective.  But you can't always see that you need a new perspective because, well, you need a new perspective to see that. It's complicated. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned over the years, it’s that it only takes one person, one moment to change your life forever, to change your perspective, color your thinking. To force you to re-evaluate everything you think you know. To make you ask yourself the important questions: Do you know who you are? Do you know what you’re doing? Do you want to live this way? 

People are really romantic about the beginnings of things. Fresh start, clean slate, a world of possibility. But no matter what new adventure you're embarking on, you're still you.  I bring me into every new beginning in my life, so how different can it possibly be?  It's all anybody wants.  A clean slate, a new beginning. Like that's gonna be any easier. Ask the guy pushing the boulder up the hill.  Nothing is easy about starting over – nothing at all.  I think that true growth and change is less of an event, and more of a gradual progression of ups and downs. There’s a stage you go through in childbirth, and it’s the toughest part. It’s called the transition stage. You’ve been pushing so hard and for so long. You’re exhausted, spent, and there’s nothing to show for all of your effort. During this transition stage it feels like you can’t go on, but it’s because you’re very nearly there. Transition is movement from one part of a life to a whole new one. And it can feel like one long, scary, dark tunnel. But you have to come out the other side, because what’s been waiting there might be glorious. Early recovery is a lot like this transition phase.  It can be scary to be criticized and find out you've been wrong or made a mistake.  But we can't be afraid to change our minds, to accept that things are different, and that they'll never be the same – for better or for worse. We have to be willing to give up what we used to believe.  Because the more we're willing to accept what is and not what we thought, the more we are able to grow as individuals.

The early bird catches the worm, a stitch in time saves nine, he who hesitates is lost. We can’t pretend we haven’t been told. We’ve all heard the proverbs, heard the philosophers, heard our grandparents warning us about wasting time, heard the damn poets about seizing the day. Still, sometimes we have to see for ourselves. We have to make our own mistakes, we have to learn our own lessons, we have to sweep today’s possibility under tomorrow’s rug until we can’t anymore. Until we finally understand for ourselves what Benjamin Franklin meant; that knowing is better than wondering. That waking is better than sleeping. And that even the biggest failure, even the worst, most intractable mistake beats the hell out of never trying.  We screw up. We lose our way. Even the best of us have our off days. As long as we admit when we’re wrong, learn from our mistakes, & remain open to constructive criticism...then still, we are moving forward.