Trusting the Process of Recovery- "Trust" Word of the Week

 "Did I offer peace today? Did I bring a smile to someone's face? Did I say words of healing? Did I let go of my anger and resentment? Did I forgive? Did I love? These are the real questions. I must trust that the little bit of love that I sow now will bear many fruits, here in this world and the life to come"- Henri Nouwen

"Did I offer peace today? Did I bring a smile to someone's face? Did I say words of healing? Did I let go of my anger and resentment? Did I forgive? Did I love? These are the real questions. I must trust that the little bit of love that I sow now will bear many fruits, here in this world and the life to come"- Henri Nouwen

In our ongoing series, Word of the Week, we are going to highlight the importance of “trust” within the context of recovery. Although arguably one of the central foundations of any healthy relationship, the process of trust is harvested over time and only obtained when an individual can apply unwavering faith that the person in question is one who will prove this faith justifiable through actions. Often times, people who suffer from addiction also have histories that involve trauma or loss. These experiences can alter one’s perception of other people’s intentions, desires, and reliability. If this particular orientation to others continues into adulthood and is not addressed, it can become a barrier to intimacy and genuine connection. Surely we have all experienced the result of lost trust in the form of betrayal, but as the saying goes, we ought not throw the baby out with the bathwater. In other words, just because trust was broken in the past, it does not mean that it inevitably happens again in the future. This is also where faith comes into play because in order to trust someone wholeheartedly, we must learn to have faith that they will hold up their end of the bargain. Engaging in this leap of faith of trusting another individual can have amazing results as we begin to understand how beneficial connection with others can be in sobriety. While I am suggesting the engagement of trust in others as a means to deepen and further connection, I am not suggesting that we flippantly trust everyone we come in contact with. We must first see evidence that the person we are going to trusting is in fact trustworthy.

There is a second component of trust in recovery which is as important as forging relationships based n trust with another person which is trusting that the incremental steps we’re taking in our recovery program will eventually lead to the realization of our vision. Here at South Orange County Detox, the architect of our program, Salina Shuler, makes the creation of a vision an essential starting point for all clients who come through our doors. She believes that if one has a vision, they can then begin the necessary steps to procure that vision by starting at wherever that particular individual is at that time. When clients are able to trust the process of recovery as well as trust their guides along the way, the results are limitless and we no longer need to bound by the chains of our addiction.

Did I offer peace today? Did I bring a smile to someone’s face? Did I say words of healing? Did I let go of my anger and resentment? Did I forgive? Did I love? These are the real questions. I must trust that the little bit of love that I sow now will bear many fruits, here in this world and the life to come.
— -Henri Nouwen